• Retrofit Government Priorities

    web retrofit jcfjHundreds of homeowners have been left high and dry by the SEAI retrofit scheme. Kevin Hargaden asks if the Government is really as invested in climate breakdown mitigation as it should be?

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  • IPCC Report is More Than Cost Benefit Analysis

    jcfj web climate changeThe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on land use was published today [8 August 2019]. It paints a stark but familiar picture of the impact human activities are having on the environment. The report, which draws on contributions from over 100 leading scientists from 52 countries across the world, highlights the need for action now, says Dr Ciara Murphy.

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  • Ireland's Bogs Are Carbon Sinks

    Untitled design 1Ireland's bogs are more than a distinctive feature of the landscape, they are a part of our identity. Restoring them is important for biodiversity, cultural and ecological significance, as well as in the fight against climate chaos, says Dr Ciara Murphy. 

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  • Rebuilding 'Rebuilding Ireland'

    rebuilding ireland cover jcfj webWhen published on 19th July 2016, the Irish Government's Rebuilding Ireland action plan for housing and homelessness described the Irish housing sector as ‘dysfunctional and under-performing’. Three years later, by practically every metric, the crisis has deepened, leading Peter McVerry SJ to label it 'an abject failure'. Rebuilding 'Rebuilding Ireland', our analysis of the plan, critiques the failure of its stated aims and offers pragmatic solutions.

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About the Centre

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice works to combat injustice and marginalisation in Irish society, through social analysis, education and advocacy.

The Centre highlights complex social issues, informs opinion and advocates for governmental policy change to create a fair and equitable society for all.

Analysis on our Key Issues

People in prison are amongst the most marginalised and vulnerable in our society. The majority have left school early, experience literacy and learning difficulties and have a history of unemployment... Click here to view all of our material on Penal Policy

Environmental protection has emerged as a key element of social justice debates in recent decades... Click here to view all of our material on Environmental Justice

The right to a safe and secure place to live is one of the most basic human rights, it is fundamental to enable people to live a dignified life... Click here to view all of our material on Housing Policy

In our political discourse, every question of human flourishing seems to be reduced to bottom-line thinking. This focus on riches impoverishes our shared discourse and has serious negative consequences for society Click here to view material on Economic Justice

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice focuses on a number of other issues... Explore all here

Our Journal

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Exploring Social Justice

Why Care - Social Justice Awareness for Younger People

Rebuilding 'Rebuilding Ireland'

rebuilding ireland cover jcfj webWhen published on 19th July 2016, the Irish Government's Rebuilding Ireland action plan for housing and homelessness described the Irish housing sector as ‘dysfunctional and under-performing’. Three years later, by practically every metric, the crisis has deepened, leading Peter McVerry SJ to label it 'an abject failure'. Rebuilding 'Rebuilding Ireland', our analysis of the plan, critiques the failure of its stated aims and offers pragmatic solutions.

The JCFJ team has written a critique of the stated aims of Rebuilding Ireland, and the ways in which each of its five pillars have effectively collapsed. Rebuilding 'Rebuilding Ireland' highlights the fact that homelessness has been normalised in the time since the plan launched. In the past three years, it has increased by two-thirds and now stands at more than 10,000 people, a figure that does not include many thousands more who make up the 'hidden homeless'. Since 2016, social housing has been redefined, and is now provided privately, due to the HAP scheme, on which the Government spends more than €2 million a day.

"The official figures for those who are homeless has been above 10,000 for most of this year, which is 65% higher than when the plan intended to solve this problem was launched. That the figure is so high it ought to be a cause of national shame to a society as wealthy as contemporary Ireland." Fr Peter McVerry SJ

The responsibility of building more homes has been left almost exclusively to private developers, something which has been catastrophic for market affordability. The rental crisis has reached new heights, and the creation of rental pressure zones, which 65% of the homes available to rent in Ireland are now located within, has added to this. The number of listings on the AirBnB website skyrocketed during the past three years, making profit for those who are homeowners and making properties unavailable to those in need of a home.

The JCFJ urges the Government to adopt a fundamentally different approach to housing policy which does not have the market at its core. It must: vastly increase the construction of publicly owned housing; introduce legislation making it illegal to evict households into homelessness, for at three years; expand the mortgage-to-rent scheme; integrate intergenerational community planning, and; make housing policy the frontline of environmental policy.

Download the full document here

© Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice 2019

To access the full list of sources used in Rebuilding 'Rebuilding Ireland' click here

Posted in Housing & Homelessness Publications

Tags: Homelessness, Housing Crisis, Peter McVerry, Rebuilding Ireland

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