Could Fr Peter McVerry be the new Minister with responsibility for Drug policy?

young drug addict manCould Fr Peter McVerry be the new Minister with responsibility for Drug policy?

Highly unlikely, but his CV would suggest otherwise. Peter has worked with people dependent on drugs since the 1970's. In the early years he would have seen abuse of Cannabis and LSE, from the late 80’s intravenous drugs such as heroin and more recently poly (multiple) drug use.

The voluntary organisation that bears his name, and which he is a Director of, works daily with people who are dependent on drugs.

Posted in Criminality, Prisons and Justice News

Continue Reading

Print Email

Launch of book advocates re-imagining the penal system

reimaginingimprisonmentlaunchwebThe launch of Re-Imagining Imprisonment: Effects, Failures and the Future took place on Thursday 5th June in City Hall. The book stems from proceedings of an international conference which was held in Dublin in September 2012, organised by JCFJ on behalf of the Antwerp-based Jesuit Scribani Network.

The book was launched in City Hall by Fr Greg Boyle SJ, who was formerly a chaplain in Folsom State Prison, California and is now Executive Director of ‘Homeboy Industries’, a non-profit organisation working with ex-gang members in Los Angeles. In his speech, Fr. Boyle discussed the need to be conscious of the inherit kinship of human beings in order to create real social change.

Posted in Criminality, Prisons and Justice News

Continue Reading

Print Email

Launching Re-imagining Imprisonment: Effects, Failures and the Future

Re-imagining Imprisonment: Effects, Failures and the Future

Thursday 5th June 2014 at 6:30 pm
(reception) for 7:00 pm start.
Venue: City Hall, Dame St, Dublin 2.

RSVP to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 3rd June 2014

Click here for full details

Countries throughout Europe are sending more and more of their citizens to prison, yet this has no correlation with crime figures. Alongside this, people are being sent to prison for longer.

This book stems from the Scribani international conference organised by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice which was held in Trinity College Dublin. The chapters analyse some of the key features of imprisonment throughout Europe today, including the political, social and economic forces shaping prison policy and practice. Authors explore how people in prison are treated and portrayed and what future imprisonment should look like in terms of policy, population size, prison conditions and most importantly, its use.

A unique publication, this book brings together contributors from different parts of Europe who work in different capacities in and around national penal systems: prison and probation officers, prisoner rights advocates, teachers, academics and others. A number of chapters act as conduits for the voices and opinions of people in prison. What binds together the variety of authors in this book is an immense desire to re-imagine how we respond to people who fall foul of the law, recognising them as fellow members of our society, and responding more constructively and with greater humanity.

Posted in Criminality, Prisons and Justice News

Continue Reading

Print Email

Overcrowding and cell sharing continues despite latest report into 2006 death

dsc00081 250x250Last week the Department of Justice published its report Commission of Investigation into the Death of Gary Douch. The report concludes that ‘Overcrowding in Mountjoy Prison completely undermined the ability of the prison to respond in a meaningful and safe way to Gary Douch’s request for protection’, and furthermore that ‘keeping seven prisoners overnight in Holding Cell 2 of the B Base was a violation of each of those prisoners’ human rights.’ This report comes seven years after Gary Douch was put in a holding cell with six other men overnight after asking to be placed in protection for fear of his life. One of these men was Stephen Egan who had just transferred from Cloverhill Prison, and before that the Central Mental Hospital, without a proper mental health evaluation or care. During the night, Egan beat Douch to death and hid his body under one of the mattresses on the floor of the cell. For the full report click here. For summary and analysis read Cormac O'Keeffe's article from the Irish Examiner.

Posted in Criminality, Prisons and Justice News

Continue Reading

Print Email