• Decision-Making Ability Impaired in Young Adults

    prison ITOn Prisoner Sunday (12th November), Eoin Carroll, Deputy Director of the JCFJ, delivered a homily at St Francis Xavier Church, Dublin, based on the parable of the ten virgins which emphasises the need for preparation in order to be able to make good decisions.

     

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  • Government must now act on Citizens’ Assembly recommendations for climate action, says Jesuit Centre

    Untitled design 12The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice has welcomed strong calls from the Citizens’ Assembly for the government to increase political action on addressing climate change.

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  • Rebuilding Ireland: A Flawed Philosophy

    Housing Final PNGRebuilding Ireland, the Government’s Action Plan for Housing and Homelessness, relies far too heavily on market-based solutions to the problems facing Irish housing. Because of this, it will fail in its stated objective of developing an ‘affordable, stable and sustainable’ housing system.

     

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  • A Constitutional Right To Housing

    myhome

    10th of October 2017 was Budget Day, and also World Homeless Day. It could have been the day the Irish Government committed to enshrining a right to housing in our Constitution, which would have had far-reaching implications for people experiencing homelessness.

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About the Centre

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice works to combat injustice and marginalisation in Irish society, through social analysis, education and advocacy.

The Centre highlights complex social issues, informs opinion and advocates for governmental policy change to create a fair and equitable society for all.

Analysis on our Key Issues

People in prison are amongst the most marginalised and vulnerable in our society. The majority have left school early, experience literacy and learning difficulties and have a history of unemployment... Click here to view all of our material on Penal Policy

Environmental protection has emerged as a key element of social justice debates in recent decades... Click here to view all of our material on Environmental Justice

The right to a safe and secure place to live is one of the most basic human rights, it is fundamental to enable people to live a dignified life... Click here to view all of our material on Housing Policy

In our political discourse, every question of human flourishing seems to be reduced to bottom-line thinking. This focus on riches impoverishes our shared discourse and has serious negative consequences for society Click here to view material on Economic Justice

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice focuses on a number of other issues... Explore all here

Our Journal

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Exploring Social Justice

Why Care - Social Justice Awareness for Younger People

Working Notes Issue 75: Inequality Matters

Working Notes Issue 75Working Notes Issue 75: Inequality Matters

There has been an increased focus on inequality in the last few years, from sources as diverse as the Occupy movement and the OECD. The slogan of the former, ‘We are the 99%’, reflects the extreme concentration of wealth and incomes in the top 1% of the population in developed countries.

While the OECD has identified that ‘Income inequality in OECD countries is at its highest level for the past half century. The average income of the richest 10% of the population is about nine times that of the poorest 10% across the OECD, up from seven times 25 years ago’.

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Peter McVerry SJ's opinion series for the Irish Times

mcverry 400x307Power and Privilege go hand in hand, Peter McVerry SJ writing in the Irish Times

Peter McVerry SJ, as a part of a five part series, in The Irish Times entitled 'Power and privilege: how the wealthy, church and global capitalism hold sway'.

In it he argues that "To try to understand poverty, the poor have been analysed to death. Volumes have been written on their backgrounds, education and every minute detail of their lives. But to understand poverty, we have to analyse wealth."

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Back to School: Why Care about Social Justice?

whycareIt’s nearly back to school time so why not check out our website on social issues called whycare.ie. Designed for both students and teachers it is an online educational resource on social justice issues in Ireland such as crime, homelessness and prison. The website provides useful information and challenging questions to encourage informed debate among young people by developing their understanding of concepts such as human rights, inequality, poverty, and the complex relationship these have with phenomena such as crime and homelessness.

Why Care? aims to promote complex social issues in a practical – rather than an abstract – way, by encouraging students to act for social justice. It highlights how each of us can act within our community or school for the promotion of social justice, and that a person does not have to be famous or extraordinary to make a difference.

The resource is broken down into four parts. The first discusses the concepts of social justice, human rights and inequality in general, on both a national and international scale. The following two sections – ‘Homelessness and Housing’ and ‘Understanding Crime’ develops students understanding of how these two issues relate to social justice, and their complex interrelationship with each other. The final section ‘Working for Justice’ gives examples of local people working for justice, and organisations in Ireland that address the issues covered in the site. There is also a ‘Teacher’s Section’, accessed with a username and password, that gives additional resources including an educators guide and class activities that relate to the various issues. For access to the Teacher’s Section, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Working Notes, April 2013: Waiting for Asylum Decisions

Working Notes Issue 71: Waiting for Asylum DecisionsThis issue of Working Notes is made up of four articles which cover a range of subjects from the Direct Provision system and racism in Ireland, to a theological discussion of the economic crisis.
 
Eugene Quinn, Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) in Ireland examines the problems within the asylum seeking process in Ireland – with specific reference to the direct provision accommodation system. He highlights the loss of morale that can occur due to the average length of the process (three and a half years), and the ban on asylum seekers taking up employment.

Catherine Lynch discusses the issue of racism in Ireland, and states that surveys and the experience of NGOs find greater incidences of racism than those officially recorded by An Garda Síochána.

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New economic model must involve a more just sharing of power as well as wealth



mcverry 250Peter McVerry SJ delivers 2012 TASC Annual Lecture, 'Inequality - A failure of Vision and Values'. McVerry challenges old mantra 'more is better' saying that it must give way to an economic model of 'moderation and restraint'.

For the full text of his talk 'Inequality - A failure of Vision and Values': http://www.tascnet.ie/upload/file/PeterMcverry070612.pdf

and a video is available at: http://vimeo.com/43728567

thejournal.ie had an edited version, available at: Ireland is not a just society. The solidarity we need has been lost

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Failure in regulation and economic liberalism

The Centre welcomes Church document critiquing the lack of global regulation and proliferation of an economic liberation which has allowed inequalities to develop and flourish.

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice welcomes the recent document by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace on the Global Economy. The document (Towards Reforming the International Financial and Monetary Systems in the Context of Global Political Authority, October 24, 2011) is a timely analysis of the grave economic and financial crisis which the world is going through, with recommendations for necessary reforms.

The analysis notes the intertwining of technical and ethical considerations that are involved.  In particular it refers to the lack of global regulation and the proliferation of an economic liberalism which has allowed great inequalities to develop, at the expense of solidarity and the common good. It recommends a ‘reform of the global architecture’ to meet the needs of the 21st century, a distinction between ordinary and investment banking, a recapitalisation of banks on condition that credit is extended to the ‘real economy’, and a Tobin tax on financial transactions.

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“Needs of those who are suffering most should be given priority” says the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice

“Needs of those who are suffering most should be given priority” says the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice in Statement issued in the context of the General Election

News Release 11:45 a.m. Sunday, 13 February 2011

In a Statement issued today, the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice says that the General Election represents a critically important opportunity for both politicians and people to determine how the problems facing the country are to be dealt with and how the burden of the adjustments that must now be made in living standards, in taxation measures, and in public expenditure programmes is to be distributed. It argues that justice and the common good require that the needs of those who are suffering most in the current recession must take priority over the demands of the more powerful.

Commenting as the Statement was published, Fr Peter McVerry SJ, who works with the Centre, said: “It will be wholly wrong and a terrible reflection on Irish society if we allow a situation where the people who must survive on the lowest incomes and who depend on the public health and care services are asked to bear the major part of the burden of rectifying the problems in our public finances. Many people are now enduring the cumulative effects of reductions in what were already low wages or social welfare payments, alongside the imposition of additional charges, cutbacks in services and longer waiting lists.”

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JCFJ Election Statement

'General Election' headline

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice Statement in the Context of General Election 2011

The General Election of 2011 is one of the most significant ever in the history of the Irish State. It takes place against a background of a deep economic crisis, which encompasses a banking crisis, unprecedented levels of national and personal debt, and the closure or downsizing of many businesses with consequent huge losses of employment. It takes place also in a context of great anger at what has happened and acute anxiety about the future.

Very few people in Ireland have escaped the effects of the downturn, but for a significant minority of the population its impact has been particularly severe, and sometimes devastating.

There are now almost 200,000 more people unemployed than there were in late 2007; at 13.6 per cent, Ireland’s unemployment rate is three times greater than it was before the recession and is the third highest in the European Union. Of particular concern is the increase in long-term unemployment and the high number of young people who are out of work. In the case of great numbers of those unemployed, the effects of joblessness – in terms of reduced income and impact on general well-being – are experienced not just by the unemployed person themselves but by their partners and children.

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Launch of 'Why Care?'

Jesuit Centre launches new Educational Initiative aimed at encouraging young people to understand and challenge injustice in Irish Society

Launch of Why Care? Thursday, 20 January 2011 (2:00 p.m.)

Click here to view an independant article written about the launch.

Due to unforeseen circumstances Eamon Gilmore, TD will not be launching this new initiative; however the launch will go ahead.

The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice, today (Thursday, 20 January 2011), in the Crescent College, Limerick, launched a new online education initiative designed to engage young people in some of the critical social issues facing Ireland today. ‘Why Care?’ is a web-based resource for educators and young people, produced by The Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice to help promote an understanding of issues such as human rights, poverty, inequality, homelessness and crime. The website (www.whycare.ie) provides a variety of audio & video clips, articles, class activity plans and links to relevant organisations in order to encourage informed debate among young people and to underline the importance of acting for social justice.

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